rr223ee's picture
From rr223ee rss RSS  subscribe Subscribe

Things You Should Know About Blacksmithing 

This is a very informative article about blacksmithing.

 

 
 
Tags:  blacksmith  blacksmithing 
Views:  27
Published:  March 08, 2012
 
0
download

Share plick with friends Share
save to favorite
Report Abuse Report Abuse
 
Related Plicks
More Relevant Information About Blacksmithing

More Relevant Information About Blacksmithing

From: rr223ee
Views: 38 Comments: 0
This is a very informative article about blacksmithing.
 
What You Don't Know About Blacksmithing

What You Don't Know About Blacksmithing

From: rr223ee
Views: 44 Comments: 0
This is a very informative article about blacksmithing.
 
An Informative Article About Blacksmithing

An Informative Article About Blacksmithing

From: rr223ee
Views: 51 Comments: 0
This is a very informative article about blacksmithing.
 
Top Tips And Other Information  Regarding  Blacksmithing

Top Tips And Other Information Regarding Blacksmithing

From: rr223ee
Views: 59 Comments: 0
This is a very informative article about blacksmithing.
 
Here's What I Know About Blacksmithing

Here's What I Know About Blacksmithing

From: rr223ee
Views: 36 Comments: 0
This is a very informative article about blacksmithing.
 
The Truth About Blacksmithing

The Truth About Blacksmithing

From: rr223ee
Views: 39 Comments: 0
This is a very informative article about blacksmithing.
 
The Truth About Blacksmithing That You May Have Missed

The Truth About Blacksmithing That You May Have Missed

From: rr223ee
Views: 47 Comments: 0
This is a very informative article about blacksmithing.
 
See all 
 
More from this user
Details About Aeromodeling

Details About Aeromodeling

From: rr223ee
Views: 498
Comments: 0

More Relevant Information About Bird Watching

More Relevant Information About Bird Watching

From: rr223ee
Views: 709
Comments: 0

Detailed Info About Mexican Food

Detailed Info About Mexican Food

From: rr223ee
Views: 1135
Comments: 0

Pertinent Information About Acupuncture

Pertinent Information About Acupuncture

From: rr223ee
Views: 489
Comments: 0

Some More  Information About  Acupuncture

Some More Information About Acupuncture

From: rr223ee
Views: 405
Comments: 0

The Truth About Airbrush Art

The Truth About Airbrush Art

From: rr223ee
Views: 425
Comments: 0

See all 
 
 
 URL:          AddThis Social Bookmark Button
Embed Thin Player: (fits in most blogs)
Embed Full Player :
 
 

Name

Email (will NOT be shown to other users)

 

 
 
Comments: (watch)
 
 
Notes:
 
Slide 1: ==== ==== For a huge selection of FREE videos about blacksmithing please visit our site. http://foryourinformation.info/videos/blacksmithing/ ==== ==== The forge is the heart of the blacksmith's shop. It is in the forge that the blacksmith heats metal until it reaches a temperature and becomes malleable enough for him to use his other equipment to shape it. The traditional blacksmith's forge has evolved and become more sophisticated over time, but the basic principles remain unchanged. The most common forge is the one fired by coal, charcoal or coke. The forge is a specially designed fire place where the temperature can be controlled so that the metal is heated to the temperature the blacksmith wants, depending on what he plans to do shaping, annealing or drawing. The there main parts of the forge are: ·The hearth where the burning coke (or other fuel) is contained and over which the metal is placed and heated. ·The Tuyere which is a pipe leading into the hearth through which air is forced. The strength of the fire and the heat it produces will depend on the amount of air being fed to it through the Tuyere tube. ·The bellows are the mechanism by which air is forced through the Tuyere tube into the hearth. While earlier bellows were pumps operated by muscles power, modern forges have high power fans or bowers to force air into the Tuyere The blacksmith adjusts the mixture of air and fuel in the hearth the produce the exact temperature needed to heat the metal. A traditional blacksmith's forge will have a flat bottomed hearth with the Tuyere entering it from below. The core of the fire will be a mass of burning coke in the center of the hearth. Around this burning coke will be a wall of hot, but not burning coal. This wall of coal serves two purposes. It provided insulation and contains and focuses the heat of the fire to a limited area, allowing the blacksmith to heat the metal in a precise manner. The hot coal also becomes transformed in coke which can then be used as fuel for the hearth. The outer wall of the fire is made up of a layer of raw coal, which is often kept damp so as to control the heat of the inner layer of hot coal so that is may slowly "cook" into coke. The size of the fire and the heat it produces can be changed by either adding or removing fuel from it as well and adjusting the air flow. By changing the shape of the outer layers of coal, the shape of the fire can also be modified to suit the shape of the metal piece being heated. Many modern blacksmiths use gas forges. These are fueled by either natural gas or propane. The gas is fed into the hearth, which is lined by ceramic refractory materials, and mixed with air and ignited. The pressure at which the gas is being fed into the hearth can be adjusted to vary the temperature. While gas forges are easier to use and require less maintenance and cleaning, the drawback is that, unlike a coal fired forge, the shape of the fire is fixed and cannot be changed to
Slide 2: suit the shape and size of the metal being heated. Go to Blacksmith Zone to get your free ebook on Blacksmithing at Blacksmith. Blacksmith Zone also has Blacksmith Information, and forums and blogs all about Blacksmithing. Visit Blacksmith Zone today to sign up for free and get your free ebook on Blacksmithing. Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Chris_Comstock ==== ==== For a huge selection of FREE videos about blacksmithing please visit our site. http://foryourinformation.info/videos/blacksmithing/ ==== ====

   
Time on Slide Time on Plick
Slides per Visit Slide Views Views by Location