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How To Make Videos 

For tips on how to make videos visit: http://videosmake.info

 

 
 
Tags:  video making  how to make videos  video maker  make videos 
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Published:  January 09, 2012
 
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Slide 1: ==== ==== Video Making Tips http://videosmake.info ==== ==== Ok, so you have an old camera from a parent or friend, or you've just purchased a new or used camera. Now you want to create something - a funny video, a short film, a school project, or a documentary on a subject you care about. But after your big purchase, that savings account might be a little on the slim side - or maybe you just don't have the budget to afford all the big-ticket items you think you need. Never fear. There's lots you can do, even if a video camera is your only piece of equipment! For the purposes of this quick overview, I'm going to assume that you have no money, no experience, and no knowledge whatsoever about how to make a video. I've written plenty of tips, advice, and information about more advanced techniques and procedures throughout the rest of the site too, so be sure to take a look at those once you've got the basics down. Your Camera It probably won't be super difficult for you to find a basic consumer-grade video camera, judging by how popular and common they are. The trick is knowing how to use it. Take a second to make sure you understand the basic functions of the camera and how to activate them. If you've used your camera before with success, you can skip to the next section. If not, there are a few things we need to go over first. The Media - How A Camera Records Every camera has to grab the visual and auditory information it captures and store it somewhere. What is the recording medium of your camera, meaning does it use tapes, an internal hard drive, mini-DVDs, or something else? In any situation but the internal hard drive camera, make sure you have the proper blank media to store your footage on. It sucks to run out of tape or hard disk space just as you are about to capture that perfect cinematic moment. So clear some space on the internal hard drive, buy some tapes, or pick up some blank video discs. Just make sure you have more than enough space to record what you need to. Starting Up Call me Captain Obvious, but do you know where the power button is on your camera, and how to operate it? Most cameras have several power modes or settings - these might include record mode, playback mode, picture/photography mode, and of course, off.
Slide 2: How about the record button? I can't believe how many times I've let someone use my camera and they inadvertently left the thing on and recording and didn't even realize it. Know when you are live and when you're on standby and you'll avoid ending up with twelve minutes of epic footage of your right leg. Often there is an indicator on your camera's viewfinder or LCD screen. A red dot, REC, or RECORD symbol means you're live, while a green dot, PAUSE, or STANDBY indicates that the camera is on but not taping. Is This Thing On? Some cameras have auto shut-off or power saving modes that will automatically power down the camera after a certain period of inactivity, usually around five to ten minutes. If your camera was on before and it isn't now, and you haven't pressed anything, check the battery first and then check whether the device has a power save function. Why Can't I See Anything? For as long as mortal man has used cameras, the lens cap has been the cause of many missed shots and lost opportunities. For cryin' out loud, look through your viewfinder or pull out your LCD screen and take a glance at your framing before you start recording. Point and Shoot I'm going to move forward and hope that if you needed to, you actually read and followed the guidelines in the previous section to familiarize yourself with how your camera works. If you aren't already familiar with cerebral concepts like how to turn a camera on, remove the lens cap and press record, I'd highly recommend reading through the text above. So what now, just point and shoot? Well, sort of. A video or movie is composed of a series of shots that, when placed one after the other, create a cohesive scene. A shot can be described as one segment of uninterrupted video that shows a particular subject from a certain angle. During some shots the camera moves, and therefore the angle can change within one shot. But a shot is still a single segment of continuous footage. Think of it as if you were to stand still in a room. Imagine that your eyes are the camera, and even if you start to walk around and maintain your gaze, you could even leave the room while continuing that gaze. Now if there were a table in the center of the room and you circled around it while looking at it the whole time, the table would look different from any given point at which you stood. As long as you never blink, you are creating a continuous "shot" with your eyes. If you were to close your eyes, move to a different point, and then open them, you'd be starting a new shot. Maybe you start at the front of the table and walk toward it. You shut your eyes and take three steps to the side. Your second shot begins the instant you open your eyes again, and continues until you close them. Taking shots with a camera from multiple angles not only provides your audience with a greater understanding of the spatial relationships between objects in your scene; it's also more interesting to watch!
Slide 3: Let's get into some specifics and look at a couple of shooting styles and their characteristics. First think about the filming you'd see on a reality television show; the typical footage on these programs is taken from hand or shoulder-mounted TV cameras. Shots tend to be slightly longer than average and make use of quick pans between subjects: two people are talking in a room and the camera moves back and forth between them to capture their conversation. Now think about an epic cinematic masterpiece like Lord of the Rings. You might see an extreme wide 'helicopter' shot from a distance that shows the Fellowship traveling over a long distance, followed by a close-up of Gandalf's face that shows the old wizard looking out across the horizon with some expression of relief, horror, or bewilderment at the next sight the party will behold. When you combine and organize two or more shots together like this to depict a particular moment or sequence in time, you've got a scene. Several scenes together (or sometimes just one long scene) will compose your entire video or film. How you go about putting these segments in order depends on the resources you have available to you. Typically you'd tape or film your shots and then bring them to an editing or post-production station. But since this page is about making videos on the cheap, I'm going off the assumption that you may not have a digital workstation on which to edit your footage. In-camera editing is a method used to shoot sequences that requires the least amount of money, but also the largest amount of precision. Here's how it works. How In-Camera Editing Works Even the most basic, low-level editing programs are pretty easy to come by these days; you can use Windows Movie Maker if you have a PC or iMovie if you're a Mac user. But if the only means you have of putting your shots together is inside your camera, you will need to organize and film each shot in sequential order, so that the final scene makes sense when you play the footage back. One of the ways to make your videos look really amateurish and tourist-y is to simply hit record and film your entire scene in one shot. This is what we call an Amateur Alert - it can be a good thing if that's the style you're going for, but in general it looks really bad unless you know what you're doing. Complete with shaky camera work, quick jolts, bobs and flash pans, this style of filmmaking is sure to induce nausea in even your most hardy viewers. Right now, you may be thinking about a scene from a major motion picture that looks exactly the way I've just told you not to film - an action sequence from a war movie, horror flick, or thriller,complete with quick action, blurry / shaky camera work, and fast-paced movement. But watch a scene like this closely and you'll notice that there are often several quick cuts between each instant of the action. Extreme, vibration-tastic close-ups of our intrepid hero's face are interspersed with wide shots of his expensive, red, soon-to-be-ruined sports car sliding into a handbrake turn as it narrowly slips under a careening tractor trailer. So while they might be more shaky than a one-legged trapeze artist, these scenes aren't filmed in a single shot.
Slide 4: Remember how often multiple shots are used the next time you're tempted to press record and lean out the passenger side of your friend's car while he does donuts through a muddy field. Not because it's ridiculously unsafe; because you shouldn't forget to take wide shots of the vehicle from a distance, too. In-camera editing goes like this: you press record, something happens, you stop film. Move to the next shot, press record, capture the action, stop film, etc. In your in-camera videos, you need to practice both keeping a steady hand and framing your shots accordingly as you start and stop recording. Timing is of utmost importance here, as every second captured on film ends up in the final product. In-camera editing is quite an antiquated method, and it usually doesn't produce very satisfying results, so if at all possible you should try to get yourself a digital workstation. That way you can spend less time worrying about starting and stopping abruptly, and more time framing your shots appropriately. Oh and by the way, if you have a computer, you're not too far off from having a digital workstation, so don't worry. I'm not trying to throw out confusing buzzwords that deal with equipment that's totally out of your grasp. In fact if you're interested right now, you can read about digital workstations here. Basic Shot Framing 101 I have an entire page dedicated to framing your shots, but for now I'll go over the most basic of basics. The three basic distance shots are called the close-up, the medium shot, and the wide shot. As a general rule, closer shots are used to show emotion. In other words, don't film close-ups of random passersby and wide shots of your main character. You want to make your audience feel close to the main character by showing facial expressions, so use close-ups to convey the thoughts and facial expressions of your principal characters. Amateur Alert: if you're framing a shot of a single person, don't put your subject dead-center. This is a surefire tactic for making your movie look home-video-tacular. I like to use the Lord of the Rings movies as examples quite often, because the cinematography in these films is top-notch; watch them if you haven't seen them, and watch them again if you have. No one is ever framed in the middle, unless it's something like the moment when Aragorn bursts through the doors to the halls of Rohan, where the shot is used for effect. Frame your subject slightly off-center, and at an angle, giving them some look room, which means if they're on the left, provide more room to the right because it's the direction in which they're looking. Use Light To Your Advantage I also have a page on lighting a scene, but again - this page is just a quick overview. Natural light can be a great source for making sure your shots are illuminated well, but if you don't have the
Slide 5: suns rays you can bounce light from a small lamp off of a white or light-colored wall or panel to create a soft glow in your shot. If you don't have room for light bouncing, aim your light directly at your subject and use some kind of filter to diffuse it, softening the beam and spreading it out over a larger area. Some household filters you could use include white bedsheets or plastic semi-transparent shower curtains. Just don't rest them on your hot lamps (or even too close) unless you really enjoy breathing toxic fumes and/or fires. Try to avoid aiming unfiltered light toward your subject's face. First of all, they'll go temporarily blind. That will make them angry and they may punch you in the throat and not want to be in your video anymore. Second, unfiltered or unsoftened light from a short distance away creates sharp lines and shadows - the shorter the distance, the sharper the shadows - so again, use bouncing, filters, and indirect light whenever you can. The Earthquake Effect The final point I'll bring up in this overview is that above anything else, the single thing you can do to make your videos and films look like they were made by a complete novice is to shoot them as if you were a dad cracking open his first camcorder on Christmas morning. Nothing screams "I've never done this before!" like filming with an unsteady hand. Tripods are your friend. If you don't have a tripod, a flat surface where you can rest the camera is a good fair-weather friend too, but get a cheap tripod if you can manage it. Making your still shots still and your action shots action-packed takes practice, but it's such a key exercise that it's worth doing over and over until you get it right. The pacing, framing, and motion of your shots will set the tone for your videos and films, and will become your most important tool for creating the atmosphere you've always imagined letting your audiences experience. Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jay_Staudt ==== ==== Video Making Tips
Slide 6: http://videosmake.info ==== ====

   
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