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Wk11 rev 17.1-19.21 

Wk11 rev 17.1-19.21

 

 
 
Tags:  false cloud  jon kohler 
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Published:  November 10, 2011
 
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Notes:
 
Slide 1: The Judgment of Babylon the Prostitute and the Beast (17:1-19:21)
Slide 2:  These chapters are an interpretive review of the sixth and seventh bowl plagues that mentioned the judgment of Babylon
Slide 3: Rev 17:1-3     The angel in this vision reveals to John that he is about to witness, in visionary format, the judgment of the world’s idolatrous Economicreligious system. The angel announces the vision and interprets it in 17:7-18 These chapters could be an expansion of the 6th and 7th bowls. Babylon is symbolically called the “whore” because she entices people to turn away from Christ and embrace her rotting enchantments
Slide 4:     V. 2: The same phrases for immorality and intoxication as in Rev 18:3, 9-19, are equated with terms for economic prosperity. This verse is dealing with the imperial cult and its relationship to economic idolatry. V. 3: The desert could allude to a place of spiritual protection that John is symbolically taken to so that he will be able to see the Whore in her true colors (12:6). The woman is not the beast but she rides the beast. She has close ties to the beast.
Slide 5: 17:4-6    V. 4: Babylon is attractive because she promises the pleasures of sensuality and prosperity. The words used in 18:16 and 17:4 to describe the woman’s attire appear in 18:12 in a list of products of trade (cf. 18:12-14). Therefore, the woman is portrayed as draped with these products to identify her with a prosperous trading system. The whore is the exact opposite of the Lamb’s bride (21:2, 9-23) and she holds in her hand the cup of abominations and unclean things.
Slide 6:    V. 5: In Revelation, the writing of names on the forehead determines the true character of the person and their ultimate relationship to God (7:3; 14:1; 22:4) or to Satan (13:16; 14:9; 20:4). Mystery relates to the unexpected way in which God’s kingdom arrives and the kingdom of evil is defeated. V. 6: The allusion to blood implies that this woman, Babylon, has been dominated by the acts of persecution against the saints.
Slide 7: Rev 17:7-18  Verses 7-18 make up the interpretation of the vision that John has just seen. When John sees the “magnificence” of the whore-like economic-religious system of the world he is tempted to be afraid and perplexed at the sight.
Slide 8:    V. 8: The beast is described in similar words that were used to describe Jesus in the first chapter of Revelation. It appears that the beast is trying to be like God; however, one must note that his existence has an end (unlike that of Christ). Beale writes, “the defeat from which the beast appears to recover is Christ’s defeat of Satan and his earthly forces at the cross and resurrection” (Beale, Revelation, 866
Slide 9:  V. 9:Rome was well known as being built on seven hills in the ancient world. “At the time when John wrote, Rome was the principal embodiment of Babylon, the worldly city.”
Slide 10: Who are the 7 kings?             44 B.C. 31 B.C.-14 A.D. 14-37 A.D. 37-41 A.D. 41-54 A.D. 54-68 A.D 68-69 A.D. 69 A.D. 69 A.D. 69-79 A.D. 79-81 A.D. 81-96 A.D. Julius Caesar Augustus Tiberius Gaius (Caligula) Claudius Nero Galba Otho Vitellius Vespasian Titus Domitian  The difficulty is determining where we begin counting.
Slide 11:     V. 11:The fact that this beast is labeled as the eighth is yet another parody between the beast and Christ. Christ died on the sixth day was buried and finally raised to life on the eighth day. V. 12: Who are the ten horns? The horns are the opposite of the elect saints through whom Christ works. They are earthly agents through whom Satan and the spiritual forces of the beast work, throughout the age and finally at the end of the age. V. 13: The one and only purpose of the kings is to give their power to the beast. They do this so that war can take place in v. 14.
Slide 12:    V. 14: The battle terminology that is described in Revelation 17:14 is from Dan. 7:21. In Daniel and in the Apocalypse, horns represent kings of the earth who fight against Jesus and his people. V. 15: The many waters are interpreted in verse 15. Isaiah uses the metaphor of many waters as “many nations” (Isa. 17:12-13). V. 16: God uses evil to destroy itself.
Slide 13:    V. 17: “This must be construed not as mere divine ‘permission’ but as divine causation” (Beale, Revelation, 887). “God has put it into their heads to carry out his purpose, the purpose mentioned in the opening sentence of the book, that every power which sets itself up against God shall in the end break itself on the Cross of his Son and the martyr witness of his saints” (Caird, The Revelation of St. John, 221). V. 18: The woman is interpreted as “the great city”. She is made up of all the religious and evil economic systems of the world throughout history. (Already and not yet).
Slide 14: The Fall of Babylon (18:1-24)
Slide 15:   The angel promised John that he would see the destruction of Babylon in 17:1; that destruction was only narrated briefly in 17:6. Chapter 18 expands upon verse 6 of chapter 17 and the angel’s promise is fulfilled in detail throughout chapter 18.
Slide 16:    V. 1: The angel is Christ because of the designation of glory attributed to him. V. 2: The prophecy and fulfillment of Babylon’s past fall is viewed as a historical pattern pointing forward to the fall of a much larger Babylon (Isa 21:9). V. 3:This drinking of wine and committing fornication with Babylon should be first understood as a metaphor for accepting the idolatrous practices of Babylon. Secondarily, it could also point to literal sexual sin since this is typically involved in the worship and allegiance to pagan deities. 18:1-3
Slide 17: Part 2.
Slide 18: God’s people are encouraged to separate from Babylon (18:4-8)  V.4:Because Babylon is going to be judged most severely, an angel encourages God’s people to come out of the great idolatrous city. Furthermore this verse contains a strong warning to those who are inside the church to abstain from the practices of the beast.
Slide 19:  “When the Old Testament prophet said, ‘Come out of her, my people’ (Jer. li. 45), he was addressing exiled Jews and telling them to make their escape from Babylon before it should fall to the invader…The only inhabitants now left in the great city are those who, through all the premonitory plagues, have obdurately refused to repent (ix. 20; xvi. 9, 11). Yet even at this late hour it is still possible for men to prove themselves God’s people and to escape their share in Babylon’s plagues by dissociating themselves from her sins. To the bitter end the miracle of grace remains open, and God never ceases to say, ‘My people’, to those who before were not his people (Hos. ii. 23; Rom. ix. 25f.; 1 Pet. ii 10)” (Caird, The Revelation of St. John, 223-24).
Slide 20:  Christians are not being called to withdraw form economic life. Nevertheless, they may be ostracized from the sphere of economic dealings because of their refusal to compromise. They are to remain in the world to witness (11:3-7) and to suffer for their testimony (6:9; 11:7-10; 12:11, 17; 16:6; 17:6; 18:24), but they are not to be of the world (e.g., 14:12-13; 16:15). Absolute physical removal would contradict the essence of the Christian calling to witness to the world” (Beale, Revelation, 898).
Slide 21:    V. 5: Jeremiah 51 is again the underlying precedent for this verse. “We would have healed Babylon, but she cannot be healed; let us leave her and each go to his own land, for her judgment reaches to the skies, it rises as high as the clouds” (Jer. 51:9). V. 6: As we have already seen in Revelation 16:5, 6 the punishment fits the crime. V. 7: The church must beware of trusting in economic security lest its members be judged along with the world. This is especially the case in Laodicea, whose church said, ‘I am rich and have become wealthy, and I have need of nothing’ (3:17)
Slide 22: Those who align with Babylon will weep for its downfall (18:9-19)  In verses 9-19 John repeats himself in an inclusio fashion. Verses 15-19 repeat expressions and themes that we will first see in verses 9-11. Both of these sections describe the weeping and mourning that takes place in the hearts of those who have prospered from the economic system of the great city. The middle section vv. 12-14 then highlights the reason for mourning. In this entire narrative the saints feel no sympathy for Babylon; rather, they rejoice because of God’s judgment.
Slide 23:     V. 9: allegiance to both Caesar and the patron gods of the trade guilds was essential for people to maintain good standing in their trades V. 10: One hour of persecution of God’s people is mirrored by one hour of judgment. V. 11: Babylon’s loss is the kings losses as well. V. 12-13: human lives are probably mentioned for gladiatorial sport.
Slide 24:    V. 16: The great city is clothed with nearly the exact same clothes as the whore. The harlot city is contrasted with Christ’s bride. V. 18-19: See Ezekiel 27:28-33
Slide 25: The Saints should rejoice because of Babylon’s judgment and God’s justification of his Glory and Character (18:20-24)  V. 20: It is those who are in heaven who are to rejoice (6:9-11). This verse is a clear echo of 12:12 where the saints are commanded to rejoice over the inaugurated victory over Satan; now they rejoice over the consummated victory over Satan’s system.
Slide 26:     V. 21: The judgment of Babylon is now cast in parabolic imagery of an angel throwing a millstone into the sea (Jer 51:63). V. 22-23: Babylon took away the means of living for Christians, and now Babylon’s means of living is taken away. The merchants were giving glory to themselves and not to God (Isa 23:8). V. 24: “Possession of wealth is not the reason for God’s judgment of Babylon. The cause lies, rather, in ‘the arrogant use of it’ and trust in the security that it brings, which is tantamount to idolatry” (Beale, Revelation, 924).
Slide 27: The Saints glorify God because Babylon is judged (19:1-6)  There is a thematic connection between Revelation 11:15-19 and chapter 19. In both chapters we see the saints rewarded and their enemies destroyed. Chapter 19:1-6 actually concludes the last section (18:20-24) of chapter 18 with the emphasis on Babylon’s fall and judgment.
Slide 28:     V. 2: The grounding reason for the saints praise is (1) God’s judgment is just, (2) God avenged the blood of the saints. V. 3: Smoke goes up forever and ever V. 4: We are taken back to the throne room V. 6: God has begun to reign.
Slide 29: The servants of God are rewarded at the wedding supper of the Lamb 19:7-10    V. 7-8: The messianic banquet of the OT is a wedding feast. The bride made herself ready by that which she had been given by God. V. 9: The saints are viewed individually.
Slide 30: God Judges Babylon’s former allies and vindicates his people (19:1121)  The second half of Revelation 19 describes Christ’s defeat and ultimate judgment of ungodly forces at the end of history. The landscape of this section breaks down into three major sections. First, Christ and his army is described (vv 11-16), next the imminent destruction of the enemy is announced (vv 17-18), and finally the picture is completed by the defeat of the beast and the false prophet along with their followers (vv 19-21).
Slide 31:    V. 11: The rider is called “faithful and true.” This is very close to the designation of the Son of Man who addresses the church of Laodicea as the “faithful and true witness” (3:14). V. 12: The “eyes like a flame of fire” point to the penetrating nature of the Son of Man’s divine judgment (1:13, 14; 2:18). The name that no one knows:    Tetragamaton= YHWH (which the Jews did not pronounce) An unknowable mystery The intimate name of God that is known in a redemptive-historical context.
Slide 32:     V. 13: The fact that Jesus is wearing a robe dipped in blood is an allusion to Isaiah 63:1-3 and God’s judgment of the nations. V. 14: The armies of heaven imitate their leader. V. 15: The sharp double-edged sword (Isa. 49:2 and 11:4, Psa. 2:9, Isa. 63:3-6) V. 16: The thigh was the typical location of the warrior’s sword (e.g., Exod. 32:27; Judg. 3:16, 21; Ps. 45:3) and the symbolic place under which the hand was placed to swear oaths (e.g., Gen. 24:2, 9; 47:29).
Slide 33:     V. 17-18: The “Great supper of God” is a gruesome caricature of the invitation to come to the wedding “supper of the Lamb.” 19:17 is the other side of the coin of 19:9! These verses are parallel to Ez. 39 and the defeat of Gog and Magog. V. 19: The war (16:14; 19:19; 20:8). V. 20-21: The final judgment of happens in two phases: first the beast and the false prophet are captured and destroyed (v 20) and then those who follow them are executed (v 21).

   
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