btking's picture
From btking rss RSS  subscribe Subscribe

Green Cruising John Hansen, Michael Crye, Paul Topping 

 

 
 
Tags:  royal  caribbean 
Views:  251
Published:  November 08, 2011
 
0
download

Share plick with friends Share
save to favorite
Report Abuse Report Abuse
 
Related Plicks
royal-caribbean-cru iseline

royal-caribbean-cruiseline

From: andrewlawson
Views: 35 Comments: 0

 
See all 
 
More from this user
Bird Flu A Chicken Raiser’S Nightmare

Bird Flu A Chicken Raiser’S Nightmare

From: btking
Views: 534
Comments: 0

No web site available

No web site available

From: btking
Views: 538
Comments: 0

Hexion 3CEE2ED8-8446-4BEA- B451-85C020EE965F_4 Q2008InvestorCallFi nal

Hexion 3CEE2ED8-8446-4BEA-B451-85C020EE965F_4Q2008InvestorCallFinal

From: btking
Views: 688
Comments: 0

Como optimizar as Campanhas Adwords para aumentar o ROI

Como optimizar as Campanhas Adwords para aumentar o ROI

From: btking
Views: 116
Comments: 0

The Business of APIs 2009 - Boomi

The Business of APIs 2009 - Boomi

From: btking
Views: 411
Comments: 0

allstate Quarterly Investor Information Earnings Press Release 2005 2nd

allstate Quarterly Investor Information Earnings Press Release 2005 2nd

From: btking
Views: 207
Comments: 0

See all 
 
 
 URL:          AddThis Social Bookmark Button
Embed Thin Player: (fits in most blogs)
Embed Full Player :
 
 

Name

Email (will NOT be shown to other users)

 

 
 
Comments: (watch)
 
 
Notes:
 
Slide 1: Canada / New England Cruise Symposium “Green Cruising – Managing Environmental Impact” June 9th, 2010 North West & Canada Cruise Association 1 John Hansen, President
Slide 2: John Hansen, President, North West & Canada Cruise Association, Moderator Michael Crye, Executive Vice President Technical & Regulatory Affairs, Cruise Lines International Association Paul Topping, Manager Environmental Protection, Transport Canada Rich Pruitt, Director, Environmental and Public Health Programs - Royal Caribbean International / Celebrity Cruises Tom Dow, Vice President-Public Affairs, Carnival Corporation & PLC 2
Slide 3: SHIP DEVELOPMENT Princess Patricia : Year built 1962 Carnival Dream : Year built 2009 3
Slide 4: Fundamentals for a viable & sustainable cruise sector Quality Product /Destinations Market Demand Health, Safety and Security Community Relations Environmental Protection 4
Slide 5: CANADA NEW ENGLAND CRUISE SYMPOSIUM “HOW IS THE SHIPPING/CRUISE INDUSTRY REGULATED?” Michael Crye, EVP Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) 5
Slide 6: REGULATORY BODIES Bodies of the United Nations develop international treaties: UN, IMO  ILO WHO  ISO
Slide 7: TREATIES What are those treaties? A. B. C. D. E. Law of the Sea Treaty (LOS) Safety of Life at Sea Treaty (SOLAS) International ship and Port Facilities Code (ISPS) International Safety Management Code (ISM) International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution form Ships (MARPOL) Standards for Training Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW) Consolidated Maritime Labour Convention (MLC) (not yet in effect) International Health Regulations (IHR) Ballast Water Convention (not yet in effect) F. G. H. I.
Slide 8: UNITED NATIONS How do these agencies of the United Nations develop these treaties? Member states, most of the countries of the world, collaborate and negotiate the treaties that control shipping actions throughout the world’s oceans. The treaties become law in a particular country when the country ratifies the treaties and incorporate them into their law.
Slide 9: UNITED NATIONS How are the Conventions enforced? Flag State Enforcement Each ship is registered in a particular country and if that country has ratified the convention, then it has the responsibility to enforce the convention. The flags that CLIA ships fly include, Bahamas, Netherlands, UK, Bermuda, Panama, Marshall Islands, Malta. All have ratified the above conventions so they apply to the CLIA ships wherever they operate. Many countries including the US and Canada delegate their inspection functions to organizations called classification societies like American Bureau of Shipping, Lloyd’s Register, Det Norske Veritas.
Slide 10: UNITED NATIONS How are the Conventions enforced? Port State Control Each of the above treaties is also subject to what is called port state control which means that when a ship visits a particular country, that country can enforce the requirements of the Convention on those ships in its waters.
Slide 11: UNITED NATIONS How are the Conventions enforced? Domestic Laws Countries like Canada and the U.S. have their own laws that apply to ships that operate within their waters. These laws can be those which implement the Conventions and incorporate them into their laws like the U.S. Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships or the Clean Water Act or Clean Air Act. In Canada the Canada Shipping Act, Migratory Bird Act, and Regulations for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships and for Dangerous Chemicals are some examples.
Slide 12: MICHAEL CRYE EVP mcrye@cruising.org Washington D.C. Area Office: 2111 Wilson Boulevard, 8th Floor Arlington, Virginia 22201 (703) 522-8463
Slide 13: Regulating vessel air emissions Canada New England Cruise Ship Symposium June 9, 2010 Paul Topping 13
Slide 14: Background North American Emission Control Area • The North American Emission Control Area proposed by Canada, United States and France was adopted on March 26, 2010 • It is the largest such area established by Parties to Annex VI of the MARPOL Convention (along coasts out to the 200 nautical limit, south of 60°N and Hawaii) • Its stringent standards are expected to reduce sulphur oxides by 96 percent and nitrogen oxides up to 80 percent as well as reduce other pollutants • This approach will protect health of North Americans on both sides of the border • The measures will come into force in August 2012. 14
Slide 15: North American Emission Control Area Adopted March 26, 2010. ___________ Includes waters under the jurisdictions of Canada, the United States, and France. 15
Slide 16: Drivers • Government of Canada Commitments on Clean Air and regulatory alignment with international standards - Accession to Annex VI to the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL) - Adoption of the North American Emission Control Area • A Harmonized Environmental Agenda for an Economically Integrated North America - North American Emission Control Area resolves US court case • Transport Canada’s Moving Forward Policy to align with IMO Standards for vessels carrying international trade • Support of Canada’s domestic fleet to modernize 16
Slide 17: Key dates and provisions • July 1, 2010, new MARPOL Annex IV - Baltic and North Sea ECA 1.5% to 1% sulphur • January 1, 2011, new ships -Tier II NOx • January 1, 2012, global sulphur level 3.5% • August 1, 2012, North American ECA (1% sulphur) • January 1, 2015, all ECAs reduced to 0.1% • January 1, 2016, new ships in ECAs – Tier III NOx • January 1, 2018, IMO review of low sulphur fuel • January 1, 2020, global sulphur level to 0.5% • January 1, 2025, alternate date for 0.5% sulphur 17
Slide 18: Nitrogen oxide standards • Tier I • 17.0 g/kWh when n is less than 130 rpm; • 45 · n(-0.2) g/kWh when n is 130 or more but less than 2,000 rpm; • 9.8 g/kWh when n is 2,000 rpm or more. • Tier II • 14.4 g/kWh when n is less than 130 rpm; • 44 · n(-0.23) g/kWh when n is 130 or more but less than 2,000 rpm; • 7.7 g/kWh when n is 2,000 rpm or more. • Tier III* • 3.4 g/kWh when n is less than 130 rpm; • 9 · n(-0.2) g/kWh when n is 130 or more but less than 2,000 rpm; • 2.0 g/kWh when n is 2,000 rpm or more; • * IMO to carry out review between 2012 and 2013 18
Slide 19: Technical options for compliance: sulphur • Sulphur levels in fuel are a performance standard • Compliance can be meet by - Low sulphur fuel • Distillates • Alternative fuels - Emission control systems - IMO Guidelines to assess emission control systems • Option for fuel with next lowest sulphur content if compliant fuel cannot be found 19
Slide 20: Vessel Air Emissions in the Great Lakes • US introduced increased air emissions standards for vessels operating in the Great Lakes in the December 2009 rules to implement the North American ECA • US subsequently moved to exempt certain vessels. • Canadian regulations to implement the North American ECA will also address emissions in the Great Lakes • Improved environmental standards are consistent with Government of Canada commitments • Canada seeks a bi-national approach to air emission regulations in consultation with industry 20
Slide 21: Next steps 1) 1) Detailed Assessment of Options Alignment of regulatory options with Government of Canada policy commitments and considerations Overall SOx and NOx reductions, harmonization of approach, health improvements, environmental improvements, competitiveness of domestic fleet, fleet renewal Ease of industry compliance Available technologies and fuels, cost of implementation, level of complexity Government capacity to implement regulations 2) 2) Decision on option for the Great Lakes in November 21

   
Time on Slide Time on Plick
Slides per Visit Slide Views Views by Location