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Three-Step Reflective Framework for an ePortfolio 



An overview of the findings from my Doctorate of Education.

 

 
 
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Published:  November 28, 2009
 
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plicker Adrian (4 years ago)
With the New Year creeping up on us faster than most of us would like, I can’t think of a better way to start off the new year than having a set plan on how to prepare a electronic portfolio that gets noticed.




Adrian Maddox

www.MyNewYearsResolutionsExtremeMakeover.com



 
 
Notes:
 
Slide 1: How can a three-step framework entice professionals to prepare evidence for an electronic portfolio? Research in partial fulfilment of the requirements for a Doctorate in Education Bronwyn Hegarty, 2007
Slide 2: Participants Masters of Education students (multimedia design). Area of practice – teachers, instructional designers, ICT coordinator (n=7). Image by dan zen E-portfolio assessment - three multimedia learning objects and supporting statements. - Four written reflections about the design and development process.
Slide 3: Case Study Research What type of reflective strategies support practitioners when they develop and present an electronic portfolio? What sort of approaches do participants take when writing reflectively? How does scaffolding provided by a facilitator assist reflection on professional practice? What was the impact of engaging in reflective writing from a professional perspective?
Slide 4: Collecting material for an e-portfolio is relatively easy, selecting appropriate material is not so hard, however, the sticking point is being able to write reflectively and critically about professional practice and being able to learn from the process (Hegarty 2008). Image by Dan Kamminga
Slide 5: A Three-Step Reflective Framework and template to support reflective writing was developed by the researcher after considering a range of research and theories. Image by David Sifry
Slide 6: Three-Step Reflective Framework Bronwyn Hegarty 2007
Slide 7: Data collection Written Reflection assignments – four per participant. Analysed for levels of reflection and the content.
Slide 9: Research question: What sort of approaches do participants take when writing reflectively? Defined as both the nature of the reflection (how participants reflected level and type of reflection) and the professional focus (what was written content).
Slide 10: Qualitative Analysis • Interpreted the content looking for patterns and themes in how participants wrote (level of reflection) and what they wrote. • Looked to see if there was a particular level of reflection at each of the different steps.
Slide 12: Five Levels of Reflection investigated
Slide 13: RESULTS RESULTS
Slide 14: % Frequency of Reflective Writing at Five Levels of Reflection (n=7) 80.0% Descriptive Explanatory Supported Contextual Critical 70.0% 60.0% 50.0% % Frequency 40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0% A B C D Participants E F G
Slide 15: Content analysis revealed themes relating to professional focus. For example, capability, relevance of pedagogical and technical approaches, issues and challenges, constraints, background. Image by qmnonic Image by 100kr
Slide 16: Conclusions Approaches used • Participants liked using the Reflective Framework (RF) – headings and prompts • Reflective writing mainly at Descriptive and Explanatory levels of reflection • Some Supported Reflection • Types of reflection included decision-making, learning, professional and personal, goals • Professional focus on capability, pedagogy, challenges • Steps of the RF do not correlate with levels of reflection
Slide 17: How can a three-step framework entice professionals to prepare evidence for an electronic portfolio?
Slide 18: Where to next? Image by Ryan McD
Slide 19: Examples of use • Teaching using blogs – reflection of learning about topics and others’ work • Research projects – blogs and journals ot record progress in action research • Reflective practice workshops • Dental students – ePortfolio at University of Otago – course work • Nursing students – reflective practice
Slide 20: References for levels of reflection and theoretical framework • Hatton, N. & Smith, D. (1995). Reflection in teacher education: Towards definition and implementation. Teaching and Teacher Education, Vol 11 (1), p33-49. Kolb, D. (1984). Experiential learning. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice Hall. McCollum, S. (2002). The reflective framework for teaching in physical education: A Pedagogical tool. Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, 73(6), 39-42. Rodgers, C. (2002). Seeing student learning: Teacher change and the role of reflection. Harvard Educational Review, Vol. 72(2), p230-253. Sparks-Langer, G., Simmons, J., Pasch, M., Colton, A (1990). Reflective pedagogical thinking: How can we promote it and measure it. Journal of Teacher Education, Vol. 41, No. 5, 23-32. • • • •
Slide 21: THE END
Slide 22: Supplementary material
Slide 23: Types of reflection Table 1: Total number of references in nine subcategories across all written reflections (n = 7) 1.2 Explanatory reflection Total references 3 1.2.1 Personal 53 1.2.2 Professional 60 1.2.3 Deciding 134 1.2.3.1 self1.2.4 questioning Reactions 11 25 1.2.5 Learning 34 1.2.6 Statements 102 1.2.7 Goals 23
Slide 24: Levels & types of reflection Descriptive – level 1 - Sub-categories - noticing, deciding, stating, goals, self-questioning. Example: “The greatest challenge in creating this learning object was in using more than one software such as PowerPoint presentation and Macromedia Flash Player, and the second challenge was in writing sentences with simple words to help students and public audience understanding the main concept of the learning object.” (Descriptive/Noticing.) (Participant G, Written Reflection 4.)
Slide 25: Levels & types of reflection Explanatory – level 2 Sub-categories - personal, professional, deciding, self-questioning, reactions, learning, statement, goals. Example: “I’ve learnt quite a bit about the technical aspects of putting web pages together (using Dreamweaver etc), but know I’m lacking on how to use interactivity in a purposeful and meaningful way” (Explanatory/personal). (Participant D, Written Reflection 1.)
Slide 26: Levels & types of reflection Supported – level 3 - Sub-categories - evidence mentioned, evidence identified, reactions, learning. Example: “This is mainly because it is focussing on an area of knowledge and understanding that the learners will have minimal prior knowledge of and it will be more difficult for learners to form direct associations. (Colvin Clark, R. and Mayer R.E 2001).” (Participant C, Written Reflection 2.)
Slide 27: Example of different types of reflective writing • “When in the lab, students can’t wait to light things, mix stuff and get things to explode.” (Descriptive/Statement.) • “To do this, students should be encouraged to look at the equipment around them and theorise what each piece is used for.” (Explanatory/Statement.) • “For this to occur, I must present information regarding equipment in different forms.“ (Explanatory/Deciding.) • “Why?” “Some students selectively listen in class, others are visual and some are kinaesthetic - they need to see and touch the equipment.” (Explanatory/Statement.) (Participant B, Written Reflection.)

   
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