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Tips For Growing Pole or Bush Type Green Beans 

Starting a garden go to http://limpys.net for more information

 

 
 
Tags:  garden  gardening 
Views:  80
Published:  March 07, 2012
 
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Slide 1: ==== ==== this and other great information for your home garden http://limpys.net ==== ==== GROWING POLE GREEN BEANS or BUSH GREEN BEANS? Many gardeners, organic and otherwise, agree that pole bean plants produce a better tasting, more tender bean over a longer harvest period than bush beans. Pole beans take a little more work to grow than bush beans because they need to be trellised. WHERE TO PLANT Growing Pole Beans will work best in a sunny location with well drained soil rich in organic matter (manure and compost). WHEN TO PLANT Pole Beans can be planted directly into the soil when soil temperatures reach 60F in the spring. GETTING THE SOIL READY FOR PLANTING For well-drained, nutrient rich soil, mix compost thoroughly into the soil. Beans don't grow well in heavy soil. Adding well-composted manure will help produce a better bean crop as well. N-P-K LEVELS Beans do well even if nitrogen (N) levels are low, while the phosporus (P) and potassium (K) levels can be moderate and pH levels can be as low as 5.0. Ideal growth will occur at pH of approximately 6.0. GERMINATING SEEDS Pre-soaking seeds in a compost tea for 25 minutes may help the seed to be more disease resistant, but not absolutely necessary. If you do pre-soak your seeds for to sprout them, be careful when you plant them as the bean sprout is delicate may be damaged easily. Growing beans take approximately 7-10 days to germinate. Using row covers will speed up the germination process by helping to maintain the correct soil temperature. Bean seeds store well in a cool, dry place for up to 3 years. STARTING YOUR BEDDING PLANTS INDOORS Beans generally don't transplant easily. If your area has a short growing season you could start
Slide 2: them indoors in peat pots or bedding plant trays 3-4 weeks before your last frost date. Pole beans take about 10 weeks to begin producing beans. PLANTING SEEDS OUTDOORS (Not Indoors First) Plant your first crop at least 2 weeks after last expected frost; the daytime air temperature should be about 70F. Pole beans are quite sensitive to cold. Space your rows about 3'-4' apart. If you're trellising, plant double rows at 1' apart. Plant seeds in approximately 2" of soil and space your seeds about 8-10" apart. If you're using a "tipi" structure, plant hills 3'-5' apart, and sow 6-8 seeds per hill, later thinning plants to 3-4 per hill. Set your supports soon after young plants appear. To increase bean production (up to 3X that of bush beans), train your pole beans up the trellis, and use a good foliar spray every 14 days. WATERING Don't over-water newly planted seeds as soggy, cold soil will cause your seeds to rot before they have a chance to germinate. Growing pole beans prefer an increasing water supply throughout the growing season. Keep water levels low at planting, moderate at flowering, and heavy during production. COMPANION PLANTING / ROTATION Crops such as corn benefit from the nitrogen fixing qualities of beans. When beans are planted following corn, they provide an excellent nitrogen amendment after corn's heavy summer usage. Bad companions crops include cabbage, onion family, kohlrabi and sunflower. Rotation of crops: Follow corn; don't follow peas, or bush beans. WHEN TO HARVEST Picking beans begins when beans are still young and tender; harvest beans when no larger than a pencil, but preferably somewhat smaller. Seeds should not yet be seen forming inside the pod. Harvesting daily encourages a greater harvest; the more you pick, the more you get. Plus you'll lengthen your growing season. STORAGE Beans will remain fresh for about a week if refrigerated. Once production passes your consumption you may preserve your beans by canning, pickling, or freezing.
Slide 3: COMMON PESTS AND PROBLEMS Pest and problems growing Pole Beans are varied, but most can be avoided when pH balance is correct and soil is aerated with composted materials. Contact your county extension for specific information for your area. SAVING SEEDS Beans are self-pollinating. Some gardeners say that beans and other legumes can be planted side by side and won't cross-pollinate. Other gardeners have experienced up to 25% cross-pollination. The percentage of cross-pollination depends on a number of factors: pollen-carrying insects, the quantity of nectar sources in the area, and the type of flower on the bean plant (larger flowers attract more pollinating insects). To be safe, don't plant beans or other legumes (lentils, peas) next to each other, especially in desert and mountainous areas where pollen sources are less available. When the pods turn brown and the seeds rattle inside, break the pods open and the beans should fall out into your hand or a bowl. If the weather is wet and your beans need to dry, cut the plant off at the ground and hang them upside down in a warm, dry place to dry. When drying is complete, shell the dry beans and store them dry in an airtight container and store in a dry, cool place for planting. They should keep up to 3 years. Barry Brown, Editor On The Green Farms http://www.OnTheGreenFarms.com Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=B_K_Brown ==== ==== this and other great information for your home garden
Slide 4: http://limpys.net ==== ====

   
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