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Mesothelioma Sui Lawyers 

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Published:  February 15, 2012
 
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Slide 1: ==== ==== Find more Informations here http://www.mesotheliomacancerlaw.info ==== ==== Alzheimer's Disease Lansing Michigan 2010 Consider Options for Long Term Care alzheimer's disease, alzheimers free guide, alzheimers home care, memory loss home care, senior care, elder care, dementia Alzheimer's Disease Lansing Michigan 2010: Consider Options for Long Term Care Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia. It is an irreversible progressive brain disease that slowly destroys brain cells, destroying memory and thinking skills and eventually the ability to carry out the simplest of tasks. The incidence of Alzheimer's is rising, however, beyond treating merely the symptoms, treatment of the underlying causes are beginning to be addressed by researchers. Find out the latest information on, causes, prevalence, current treatments and new treatment strategies that are on the horizon. What causes Alzheimer's disease? Although how the disease starts it is still unknown, we do know that damage to the brain begins as early as 10 to 20 years before problems are evident. This occurs in the formation of abnormal clumps (amyloid plaques) and tangled bundles of fibers (neurofibrillary tangles). As plaques and tangles form, healthy neurons lose their ability to function, and eventually they die. This damaging process spreads to the hippocampus, a nearby structure that is essential for forming memories. As the death of neurons increases, affected brain regions begin to shrink. By the final stage of Alzheimer's, damage is widespread and brain tissue has shrunk significantly. It is likely that over a long period of time, age-related changes, genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors occur and contribute to disease progression. Age-related changes -in the brain include atrophy (shrinking) of certain parts of the brain, inflammation, and the production of unstable molecules called free radicals which harm neurons. Genetics - people who develop Alzheimer's before age 65 usually have a mutation, or permanent change, in one of three inherited genes located on chromosomes 1 (SEN2), 14 (SEN1) and 21 (APP, A4). These gene mutations cause "early-onset" disease, however, not all early-onset cases are caused by these mutations. Most people have "late-onset" disease, which usually develops after age 65, and is linked to the gene APOE. Having the APOE e4 form of APOE, increases a person's risk of getting Alzheimer's. Forty percent of all people who develop late-onset Alzheimer's carry APOE e4. However, carrying APOE e4 does not always mean that a person will develop Alzheimer's, and people carrying no APOE e4 forms can still develop the disease. Additional genes may influence the development of late-onset disease. Scientists have identified variants of the SORL1, CLU, PICALM, and CR1 genes that may play a role in risk of late-onset
Slide 2: Alzheimer's. Lifestyle factors -new research suggests that a nutritious diet, physical activity, social engagement, and mentally stimulating activities can all help to reduce the risk of cognitive decline and Alzheimer's Disease. Scientists are now investigating associations between cognitive decline and vascular and metabolic conditions such as heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, diabetes, and obesity to determine whether reducing risk factors for these diseases may help with Alzheimer's. New information on Alzheimer's Disease as of 2010 As stated by the Alzheimer's Association report of 2010, new information on several aspects of the disease is evident: 5.3 million Americans have Alzheimer's disease and 5.1 of these are over age 65.That is 1 in 8 people over the age of 65. More women have the disease than men, primarily because women live longer than men. Less education is associated with a higher risk of developing dementia, possibly due to less cognitive reserve, a lower socio-economic status, and poorer medical care. African Americans are two times and Hispanics are one and one half times more likely than whites to have dementia. This may be related to incidence of high blood pressure, diabetes, low socio economic status and education. Current treatment - the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved five medications to treat the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease by disease stage. Donepezil (Aricept) for all stages. Galatamine (Razadyne), Rivastigmine (Exelon), and Tacrine (Cognex) for mild to moderate stages. Memantine (Namenda) for moderate to severe stages. Future treatments-three separate clinical trails are beginning, to determine future diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer's Disease. Better diagnosis -using biomarkers to identify disease at a very early stage where symptoms and impairment are milder. Immunoglobulin Treatment-Using intravenous immunoglobulin IGIv, to reduce the presence of amyloid plaques. Treatment with Ceregene's CERE-110 -, a gene therapy product designed to deliver nerve growth factor (NGF) to the brain for a general treatment strategy Eventually, most people who have Alzheimer's need outside care. Consider the options, from respite care and adult day services to assisted living and nursing home care. Early on, many people who have Alzheimer's do well at home. Eventually, however, even the most loving and accommodating family may be unable to meet the needs of a person who has Alzheimer's. Difficult as it may be to seek outside care, it's important to consider your loved one's long term care options. Here's help getting started.
Slide 3: Keeping your loved one at home At first, you might be most comfortable keeping your loved one at home. A continuum of home care resources may be available in your community, including: Respite care. You might use respite services to care for your loved one when you need a break. Various community organizations or residential facilities may offer respite care services. Respite care may be available through informal resources as well. For example, family, friends or neighbors may be available to help. Adult day services. Also known as elder care programs, adult day services provide socialization and activities for adults in need of assistance. Some programs are specifically designed for people who have Alzheimer's disease. These programs are generally available during daytime hours, usually weekdays only. Staff members lead various activities, such as music programs and support groups. Most programs provide a lunchtime meal, and some offer transportation as well. Home health services. The most common assistance involves personal care such as eating, bathing, dressing, grooming and toileting. Some agencies also provide help with meal preparation and household chores. Most provide nursing care that may include help with medications, wound care and medical equipment. Some agencies provide additional services, such as physical therapy. Considering residential care options Safety in the home. Discovering that a family member has Alzheimer's disease can be a sad and difficult discovery. This is a disease that is very difficult to deal with because it is so drastic and changes the person so much. There are a lot of home safety precautions that you probably have never considered before having a family member in the home diagnosed with this disease. However it is important that you begin to pay attention to these details so your loved one can live safely in your home for as long as possible. This article will outline some of the precautions that you should consider taking in your home. Many of these may seem excessive to you at first. It is up to you to decide what is appropriate for your loved one in your home. - Always keep your list of emergency numbers near every telephone in the house. - Make sure that you have enough smoke and carbon monoxide detectors throughout the house and that their batteries are functioning and have been replaced recently. - Childproofing things like electrical sockets and drawers and cabinets is a good idea. - Put away anything potentially dangerous or toxic in a locked and secured place. With this point you can never be too cautious. Once you realize that you should have locked something away, it's
Slide 4: usually because it's already too late. - Medications should be locked away from your family member to avoid that they take unneeded medication without realizing it. - Hide a key somewhere on the outside of a house. There have been instances when a person with Alzheimer's in a confused state locks out their loved ones. If this happens you will have a key in order to re-enter the home. - Make sure that you have adequate lighting throughout the home and outside the home. - If you have a home security system be sure that the company is aware that you have a person in the home with Alzheimer's. Home alarm systems often have some kind of panic button installed and you don't want your loved one alerting the home security company when there is not an emergency. On the other hand, this function can be used by you and other family members if someone in the family needs to alert the home security company of a situation. - Keep all floor areas free of clutter and things that could be tripped over. This could include cords, wires, throw rugs, and other clutter in the house. - Consider installing an automatic shut off feature in your home stove. You can also remove the knobs on the stove and use them only when you are there to oversee. It may not be necessary to make all of these changes right away. The important thing to do is stay aware and continue to observe the changes in your loved one. If it seems like it might be appropriate to make additional changes in the home at some point, then don't hesitate to do so. The safety of your loved one and the rest of your family comes first. Safety is the first step when it comes to alarm systems. Contact adt security for more tips on how to keep your home safe. Article Source: As Alzheimer's progresses, your loved one will need more help. At some point, you may want to consider alternative housing options in your community. For example: Assisted living. People who may need support with personal care and daily activities, such as meal preparation, but don't need the medical care of a nursing home may be well-suited for assisted living facilities. These facilities -also known as board and care, group homes or community-based residential facilities -are best for those who have moderate functional impairment but can care for themselves with some assistance and move around safely without help. Specialized dementia care facilities. People who need more supervision and assistance than may be offered in assisted living facilities may benefit from "memory care" assisted living. These facilities generally offer more staff members, specialized staff training and activity-based programming-as well as secured exits and enhanced visual cues (such as signs or pictures) to
Slide 5: help residents feel more oriented in unfamiliar surroundings. Nursing home. If your loved one needs medical care, a nursing home may be the best option. These facilities provide room and board with 24-hour nursing care. Some nursing homes have special units for people who have Alzheimer's - designed so that the environment, activities, philosophy of care and staff training revolve around the special needs of people who have Alzheimer's. Choosing the type of care To determine which type of care is best for your loved one, consider the following questions: Does your loved one need help preparing meals or taking care of other personal needs? Does your loved one need help taking medications or managing other medical problems, such as heart disease or diabetes? Does your loved one need 24-hour supervision or special care? If so, what type of skills must a caregiver have to provide that care? Would you prefer a facility that specializes in Alzheimer's care? How will you cover the costs of your loved one's care? Keep in mind that some settings aren't designed for people who have Alzheimer's and as your loved one's needs change, options for care may change as well. Any new care arrangement you make will involve blending your capabilities as a caregiver with your loved one's needs. Sharing the burden improves care Remember that seeking help can ease the physical and emotional burdens of caregiving, which benefits both you and your loved one. And the earlier you consider the options, the better. If you wait until a crisis arises, you may be pressured to make a hasty decision. Instead, take time now to evaluate your loved one's future options. ==== ==== Find more Informations here http://www.mesotheliomacancerlaw.info ==== ====

   
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